JGS - Just Good Shots

There are times when you take shots that you do not know what you captured until you look at them later, with a fresh, unbiased mind and eye.  Some people call this a “picture within a picture”.  The really nice shots seem to not belong with all the others on a shot. Or, when a shot is one of many - but it is so moving that it adds to the message of each of the others - then you’ve got something.

Heidi was 2 days old when she died.  Children and spouses can only be buried at  Arlington National Cemetery  if a parent or spouse is already interred there. That means that the pregnant wife of Private L S Byrum suffered the loss of her husband. Then two days after delivery, she lost her daughter, too.  Two years later, she lost her other daughter, Rhonda - almost exactly 2 years later.

Behind this plot is another for a soldier of the same rank who served in WWII, then Korea and then Viet Nam. He too died while on active duty. He was not even 50.

One adopted son, George Washington Parke Custis, built the first home on this property. Custis’s son-in-law Robert E Lee (yes, that  Robert E. Lee) built the gardens here. When Virginia seceded from the Union, Lee went to lead the Virginia Military, and never returned to live here.  At that time this was all private property which allowed any people to be buried there. After the Civil War, the Federal government purchased the land outright. In a major ruling, all headstones were made to be the same size and shape, giving equal honor to all - whether or not the soldiers were Confederate.


A fun shot. Ever wonder about children who resemble their parents?   Take a look.  This is a mother and daughter. No changes were made to the photos. One shot was placed on top of another, then pieces of one were removed until the other shot is fully exposed.

In the background, by the Potomac River is the Pentagon, the Department of Defense.

So much has happened at Arlington National Cemetery. When George Washington married Martha, she was already a  widow with children, whom Washington adopted.